By

Testifying before Congress on Earned Sick and Safe Leave

Yesterday I was privileged to testify to Congress about Montgomery County’s Earned Sick and Safe Leave Law, which guarantees that most Montgomery County workers can earn at least seven sick days each year. The U.S. House Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions held a hearing on paid leave and I testified in opposition to a terrible proposal that would allow companies to opt out of our local law in favor of a much weaker federal standard. Please see the video below for more:

By

Council Vice President Riemer, MCPS Superintendent Dr. Jack Smith to Speak at Landmark STEM Education Launch

“Invent the Future Challenge” kick-off at KID Museum in Bethesda on Thursday, November 30 at 11:30 a.m.,represents major investment in student-driven innovation

ROCKVILLE, Md., November 27, 2017—Council Vice President Hans Riemer and Dr. Jack Smith, Superintendent of Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS), will be among the featured speakers at the kick-off event for the “Invent the Future Challenge” on Thursday, November 30 at 11:30 a.m. at KID Museum in Bethesda. This new public-private partnership brings together the County, MCPS, and KID Museum to make a long-term investment in student engagement with the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields. It will bring hands-on STEM learning opportunities to children at every middle school in the MCPS system.

Cara Lesser, Founder and CEO of KID Museum, and Antonio Tijerino, President and CEO of the Hispanic Heritage Foundation, are also featured speakers at the launch. KID Museum is located at 6400 Democracy Boulevard, Bethesda, Md. 20817. Elected officials, members of the press, and education leaders are invited to attend.

The “Invent the Future Challenge” is a competition which will engage middle school students in the STEM fields and 21st century technology and professional skills, with special emphasis on the areas of design/engineering and electronics/coding. Teams of middle schoolers led by adult coordinators will compete for prizes using Challenge Starter Kits which include the Arduino electronics platform. The partnership provides scholarships for intensive, skill-building pre-competition workshops for low-income students at KID Museum.

“I’m excited to be part of launching this new partnership between MCPS and KID Museum to bring high-quality, data-driven, maker-based STEM learning programs to Montgomery County students,” said Council Vice President Riemer. “Last February I held a Countywide STEM Summit to help build these kinds of connections, and it is a win-win for us to support a great local organization and bring sorely needed new resources to our middle school students. For several years I have worked hard to increase County investments in new approaches to STEM and maker learning. It is thrilling to see MCPS embracing KID Museum and bring STEM education to middle school students throughout the County.”

Council Vice President Riemer has been a strong advocate for increasing resources for STEM education in the County. He moved to establish a Coding Fund and Maker Fund in the County budget, which provide small grants to community organizations. He has prioritized sponsoring the annual Maker Faire KIDfest and providing grants to nonprofits like KID Museum and others, and hosted the County’s first STEM Summit in early 2017.

Free parking is available on-site. For information about transit to the event, visit http://kid-museum.org/location/.

For questions or further information, contact Jason Fasteau in the Office of Council Vice President Riemer at 240-777-7964 or
Jason.Fasteau@montgomerycountymd.gov, or emma@kid-museum.org. Information about the event is also available at www.kid-museum.org/invent-the-future.

# # # #

By

Council Vice President Riemer Introduces Bill to Increase Affordable Housing at Council Meeting on Tue., Nov. 14

ROCKVILLE, Md., November 14, 2017—Montgomery County Council Vice President Hans Riemer introduced Bill 38-17, Housing – Moderately Priced Dwelling Units (MPDUs) – Requirement to Build, during the Council’s legislative session at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, November 14. Bill 38-17 would increase affordable housing in Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) High School Service Areas that have low poverty rates. Councilmember Sidney Katz is a cosponsor.

Bill 38-17 would increase the minimum percentage of moderately priced housing units (MPDUs) that are required to be built in new residential developments from 12.5 to 15 percent in a MCPS High School Service Area with an eligibility rate for free and reduced meals (FARMS) of 15 percent or less. The Planning Board would make the determination about the number of affordable homes required at the time an applicant submits a preliminary plan of subdivision.

“Over the years, the County’s affordable housing requirements for new development have been recognized as among the best in the nation. By requiring affordable housing be built with every new development, we ensure that affordable housing is available throughout the County. However, we haven’t been able to keep pace with the need,” said Council Vice President Riemer. “This bill will result in more affordable housing in the communities where having it makes the biggest impact and where the market can best absorb it. We need more housing options for working families, young people who want to establish roots in our community, and seniors who are living on fixed incomes.”

The Council enacted the County’s moderately priced dwelling unit law in 1973 with the objective of providing a full range of housing choices for all incomes, ages and household sizes. The MPDU law was designed to meet an important need for low and moderate-income housing, and ensure that moderately priced housing was dispersed throughout the County.

In 2010, a Century Foundation study called “Housing Policy is School Policy” examined academic outcomes among low income students in Montgomery County who had been moved from traditional public housing and placed in MPDU’s in low poverty areas. The study found that by the end of elementary school, the lower income students who lived in higher income communities as a result of the MPDU program “far outperformed” their peers in lower income communities. Read the full study here: https://tcf.org/assets/downloads/tcf-Schwartz.pdf

Students can qualify for Montgomery County Public Schools Free and Reduced Price Meals program based on household size and income, as well as eligibility for Food Supplement Program or Temporary Cash Assistance benefits. Individual student’s eligibility status is held strictly confidential, but MCPS reports an aggregate rate of FARMs eligibility annually for each school. More information about the FARMs program is available here.

The staff report on Bill 38-17 can be viewed here.

For more information or questions, please contact Ken Silverman in the Office of Council Vice President Riemer, at 240-777-7830.

# # # #

By

Montgomery County becomes first in the State to have green pavement markings on State highways

ROCKVILLE, Md., November 9, 2017 — Residents passing through downtown Silver Spring may notice green markings on the pavement inside the intersections. These markings represent a new type of bicycle infrastructure and a first in the State of Maryland.

As part of the “Silver Spring Circle’s” Spring Street protected bicycle lane project, Montgomery County is now first in the state to have support for a protected bike lane on a State highway, through the installation of high visibility green paint through the intersection crossings at Georgia Ave (MD 97) and Wayne Avenue (MD 594A). MCDOT will complete the markings at the Spring St. / Colesville Ave. (MD 29) intersection once the State Highway Administration (SHA) completes planned repaving in 2018.

The announcement follows a letter (pdf) sent in May 2016 to SHA requesting the change by Council Vice President Hans Riemer, Council President Roger Berliner, and Councilmember Tom Hucker, as well as the District 20 State Delegation, Senator Jamie Raskin and Delegates Sheila Hixson and David Moon.

Council Vice President Riemer lauded the work: “These safety markings symbolize big steps forward for bike infrastructure in Montgomery County. Green pavement markings substantially increase the visibility of bicyclists and make motorists and bicyclists more predictable to one another. While the County has been installing green pavement markings on County roads for several years, there is great value in installing these in intersections with state highways, where the conflicts are particularly acute. I am proud that Montgomery County continues to lead the state in safe bicycling infrastructure, and I look forward to seeing more examples of these throughout the County.”

Research has shown that pavement markings can have significant effects on safety. A 2008 Danish study in “Accident Analysis & Prevention” found that colored bike lanes in intersections resulted in a 10% reduction in accidents and 19% reduction in injuries. Some other benefits include discouraging illegal parking by cars, increasing motorist yielding behavior, and enhancing bicyclist comfort.