By

Council Vice President Riemer Introduces Bill to Increase Affordable Housing at Council Meeting on Tue., Nov. 14

ROCKVILLE, Md., November 14, 2017—Montgomery County Council Vice President Hans Riemer introduced Bill 38-17, Housing – Moderately Priced Dwelling Units (MPDUs) – Requirement to Build, during the Council’s legislative session at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, November 14. Bill 38-17 would increase affordable housing in Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) High School Service Areas that have low poverty rates. Councilmember Sidney Katz is a cosponsor.

Bill 38-17 would increase the minimum percentage of moderately priced housing units (MPDUs) that are required to be built in new residential developments from 12.5 to 15 percent in a MCPS High School Service Area with an eligibility rate for free and reduced meals (FARMS) of 15 percent or less. The Planning Board would make the determination about the number of affordable homes required at the time an applicant submits a preliminary plan of subdivision.

“Over the years, the County’s affordable housing requirements for new development have been recognized as among the best in the nation. By requiring affordable housing be built with every new development, we ensure that affordable housing is available throughout the County. However, we haven’t been able to keep pace with the need,” said Council Vice President Riemer. “This bill will result in more affordable housing in the communities where having it makes the biggest impact and where the market can best absorb it. We need more housing options for working families, young people who want to establish roots in our community, and seniors who are living on fixed incomes.”

The Council enacted the County’s moderately priced dwelling unit law in 1973 with the objective of providing a full range of housing choices for all incomes, ages and household sizes. The MPDU law was designed to meet an important need for low and moderate-income housing, and ensure that moderately priced housing was dispersed throughout the County.

In 2010, a Century Foundation study called “Housing Policy is School Policy” examined academic outcomes among low income students in Montgomery County who had been moved from traditional public housing and placed in MPDU’s in low poverty areas. The study found that by the end of elementary school, the lower income students who lived in higher income communities as a result of the MPDU program “far outperformed” their peers in lower income communities. Read the full study here: https://tcf.org/assets/downloads/tcf-Schwartz.pdf

Students can qualify for Montgomery County Public Schools Free and Reduced Price Meals program based on household size and income, as well as eligibility for Food Supplement Program or Temporary Cash Assistance benefits. Individual student’s eligibility status is held strictly confidential, but MCPS reports an aggregate rate of FARMs eligibility annually for each school. More information about the FARMs program is available here.

The staff report on Bill 38-17 can be viewed here.

For more information or questions, please contact Ken Silverman in the Office of Council Vice President Riemer, at 240-777-7830.

# # # #

By

Update on the Nighttime Economy Task Force

To be competitive for creative-class workers as well as empty-nesters, Montgomery County must be able to offer the new urban quality of life that those residents are seeking. To advance this issue, I requested the County Executive to establish the Nighttime Economy Task Force, which examined policies, resources and amenities that impact Montgomery County’s nightlife offerings. The task force led to the passage of numerous pieces of legislation in the Maryland state legislature as well as the County Council, all of which make it easier for restaurant and entertainment-oriented businesses to thrive in Montgomery County. I think it has been a success.

Please see the most recent implementation report below (PDF), as prepared by the County Executive’s team.

Nighttime Economy Task Force Implementation Summary May, 2015

Task Force Recommendations

County Executive Ike Leggett appointed the Montgomery County Nighttime Economy Task Force in May 2013 to explore ways of improving nightlife offerings at Montgomery County’s urban centers to meet the changing needs of our community.

After five months of intense work, the Nighttime Economy Task Force delivered the report, “Destination Montgomery,” to the County Executive with 32 recommendations for improving options and quality nightlife in Montgomery County. These recommendations covered the following six areas:

  1. Arts and Entertainment,
  2. Business Engagement,
  3. Public Space and Amenities,
  4. Quality of Life,
  5. Transportation, and
  6. Venue Operations and Public Safety.

Implementation Overview

A year and half after the report’s official release, the recommendations are at varying stages of implementation. A few have been implemented, some are actively being implemented, others are being further evaluated, and a few are no longer applicable or supported by the County government.

Recommendations successfully implemented

  1. Recommendation: Extend the hours of operation for venues with beer/wine/liquor licenses to 2 am on Sundays through Thursdays, and to 3 am on Fridays, Saturdays, and the Sundays before Monday federal holidays.
    Status: HB-463 and SB-657 were passed were passed in support of the recommendation.
  2. Recommendation: Expedite the creation of a social venue license, and modify the current alcohol to food ratio under the Class B beer/wine/liquor license from 50/50 to 60/40, to reflect the change in increased demand for higher quality, higher priced alcoholic beverages and to encourage establishment and operation of venues that host live music and other events.
    Status: HB-142 and SB-300 were passed in support of the recommendation.
  3. Recommendation: Develop an educational Patron Responsibility Program.
    Status: Montgomery County Department of Liquor Control (DLC) has partnered with Brown-Forman and a designated driver program called “Be My Designated Driver” (BeMyDD), to encourage people to plan their night out and ensure a safe ride home. These programs are being promoted by alcohol serving venues with a planned community education program with private sponsorship.
  4. Recommendations: Planning or Zoning Changes:
    1. Amend zoning standards to provide flexibility in meeting public use space and open space requirements.
    2. Support additional density in the County’s urban areas to foster a vibrant
      nighttime economy.
    3. Explore alternative, more attractive incentives for developers to include suitable, affordable performance spaces for small and emerging arts groups.

    Status: The Montgomery County National Park and Planning Commission finalized in 2014 the Zoning Rewrite for the county which ultimately, updated zoning codes and the zoning map that helped address the recommendations listed above. One remaining opportunity revolves around understanding the opportunities available under the Arts & Entertainment Districts. The Department of Economic Development is helping draft information both for the Planning Department and other entities on the Arts & Entertainment Districts but also other related tax incentives that exist for developers including Enterprise Zones, Façade Improvements, Green Building Codes, the Public Art amenity, just to name a few.

Recommendations being Implemented (in progress)

  1. Recommendation: Improve awareness of parking options.
    Status: All three urban districts are in agreement in utilizing and promoting the ParkMe application (www.parkme.com) for visitors and consumers, which is the preferred application by the Montgomery County Parking Lot District.
  2. Recommendation: Marketing County business resources and assets.
    1. Market A&E districts and county business resources to property owners.
    2. Create, develop, and implement a marketing program for the County.

    Status: These above recommendations are being advanced by multiple partners. The three A&E districts are exploring Placemaking options to enhance urban vitality and an inviting atmosphere that include both daytime and nighttime hours. The Office of the County Executive is taking a lead on developing a comprehensive economic strategy that will include better alignment of place-based economic development and program- based economic development. It is also in the middle of a multi-year marketing and branding project with several short-term projects to be delivered in spring 2015.

  3. Recommendation: Develop and implement a busker program to provide entertainment in urban areas.
    Status: The Silver Spring Regional Center and the Montgomery County Innovation Program has been developing the idea of a busker program to be piloted with the Silver Spring Arts & Entertainment Advisory Committee, the Silver Spring Citizens Advisory Board and Silver Spring Urban District Advisory Committee. This group has been working on several areas including Identifying Potential Busking Areas, Developing the Specific Parameters for Busking, Enforcement, and Promotions and Marketing.
  4. Recommendation: Enhance pedestrian and bicycle access.
    Status: Bethesda, Silver Spring, and Wheaton are all moving forward to achieve this goal based on their unique needs. Bethesda has made a top priority improving lighting. Silver Spring and Wheaton have made has made pedestrian walkability a top priority through lighting, walking and biking accessibility.
  5. Recommendation: Create Urban Parks Guidelines to activate public space through design elements, enhance the greater community, and foster multiple uses to appeal to a range of demographics at different times.
    Status: The Department of Parks is working with Planning on efforts to activate spaces such as in Silver Spring, especially in areas that are not public parks but are public properties or quasi-public such as WMATA, while developing guidelines for new development particularly within urban areas to help define and develop spaces that can foster activity both during the day and evening.

Recommendations being further evaluated

  1. Recommendations: Developing transportation options.
    1. Expand the “Safe Ride” program to all weekends (Friday evening through early
      Sunday morning).
    2. Increase the number of taxi stands.

    Status: Due to the changing market and new players like Uber that are challenging existing regulations and established players like taxis, the Council is working on addressing taxi regulations that will help address the recommendations moving forward.

  2. Recommendations: Business Services Tailored to the Small Business Community.
    1. Create a concierge service that promotes positive customer service, assists with streamlining the planning and permitting process, and facilitates working relationships with multiple departments for the business consumer.
      Status: Several departments provide concierge service to small businesses including the Department of Economic Development, the Department of Liquor Control, and the Department of Permitting Services.
    2. Recommendation: Simplify and streamline the process businesses must go through in order to open an arts and entertainment venue or hold an arts and entertainment event.
      Status: The County Council has just approved a new Ombudsman in the Office of the County Executive for commercial and residential development projects who will report directly to the Chief Administrative Officer. DPS has consolidated the permitting process to support new and existing restaurants through its “Recipes for Success Packet” to explain the process of opening a restaurant in Montgomery County.
  3. Recommendation: Develop a targeted strategic plan for attracting new companies to the County, fostering entrepreneurship, and growing our existing businesses based upon the target markets.
    Status: The Comprehensive Economic Strategy underway will address the above issues and serve as a comprehensive blueprint for Montgomery County’s future economic success, including how retail and placemaking can support an overall economic vision and vitality. Achieving this recommendation would require further research into the retail inventory in the county’s urban centers ultimately leading to the creation of a retail plan for the county. This would help show gaps in retail, especially with those that are and/or can become retail destinations. That information would then lead to the strategic and targeted company attraction referenced by the task force.
  4. Planning and Development
    1. Recommendation: Reduce opportunity for crime in urban areas by incorporating Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) techniques.
      Status: This is a shared responsibility between a cluster of departments including Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission, General Services and the urban districts in creative placemaking to eliminate dead spots and create an inviting atmosphere at the urban centers.
    2. Recommendation: Encourage more housing options.
      Status: Two issues related to housing options need to be addressed–the size of dwelling units and the parking standards for these developments that need to be further explored.
  5. Transportation Options at Night
    Recommendations:

    1. Improve/expand the circulator service in focus areas.
    2. Expand the frequency and reach of late-night transit service.

    Status: All three urban districts would encourage WMATA to extend hours on weekends to 3am, especially with the extension of hours to 3am in FY15. Additional bus service should be considered if demand increases over time.

  6. Urban Districts Support and Development
    Recommendations:

    1. Support dedicated public safety resources for the nighttime economy in high density
      urban centers.
    2. Increase funding for Business Improvement Districts and Urban Districts.
    3. Professionally manage and maintain public spaces through the private sector or
      through public-private partnerships (similar to the Bethesda Urban Partnership). Urban District would like to increase coordination with MNCPPC as Optional Method Developments (OMDs) come on board within the districts to activate public and private spaces.

    Status: These are long-term, broad-based recommendations, most of which will be supported as demand for services increases over time, especially for police and the urban districts services in each area. To sustain this enforcement would certainly require identifying the related departments and future funding sources, especially as it pertains to the urban districts. How this is achieved depends heavily on the types of services to be delivered in each urban district or new ones identified over time.

  7. Urban Noise Areas
    Recommendation: Amend the County’s noise ordinance to allow for the establishment of Urban Noise Areas around appropriate locations (e.g., Rockville’s Town Square, Silver Spring’s Veteran’s Plaza and downtown); increase the allowable noise levels for qualifying arts and entertainment activities in these areas to 85 dBA (measured at 100 feet from stage, PA, or other center of the performance); increase the time allowed for these levels to midnight; and ensure that nearby residents are informed prior to moving in of the possibility of event-related noise.
    Status: There are some policy considerations about the recommendation of the NETF, which is a “one-size fits all” approach that proposes a noise standard that could allow much higher noise at receiving properties than currently permitted under Chapter 31B. The recommendation also proposes a different approach to regulating noise than the current noise law by regulating the level of noise a source is permitted to produce rather than the level of noise heard by a receptor. This ignores the reality that different locations have different characteristics, and that what is reasonable at one location may be unreasonable at another. For these reasons, DEP believes it would be prudent to establish specific parameters for each UNA depending on the characteristics of the site. Some policy guidance would have to be provided regarding the balance between those entities creating the noise and those affected by it.

Recommendations no longer applicable or supported
The below recommendations are not being actively supported by the County government at this point for various reasons.

  1. Recommendation: Allow food trucks to operate after 10pm.
    Status: Montgomery County government is exploring options for mobile vending for all hours, not limited to nighttime hours.
  2. Recommendation: Artist tax that would incentivize venues that pay musicians to performance.
    Status: This recommendation is deemed a low-impact measure and thus not supported at this time.
  3. Recommendation: Development of Large-Scale Nighttime Events.
    Status: All three urban areas are concerned about large scale events that may compete with surrounding businesses.

By

Thoughts on the Westbard Sector Plan

Following are my prepared remarks on the Westbard Sector Plan. You may also watch a video of my remarks as delivered.


I want to start by thanking all the people who put a great deal of time into formulating this plan. Hundreds of Westbard residents – and residents across Montgomery County – who wrote, called, and came to testify to the Planning Board and the Council throughout this process, and while no one person is getting exactly the outcome they might want, I truly believe that the plan before us today is much better because of the extensive public input we’ve received – and the many changes we have made in response. Ultimately, I believe that this plan strikes the right balance between respecting the legitimate expectations of the existing community and providing a sustainable path for future growth.

I think some context might be helpful for anyone who cares to understand my vote today, so I hope my colleagues will excuse me if this is a little long:

I ran for Montgomery County Council as a progressive Democrat because I am deeply committed to the progressive values of social justice, equal opportunity, and shared responsibility. Here at the local level, these values play out very differently than they do on cable news – the county council doesn’t get much say over immigration, or gun control, or foreign policy.

Instead, we reflect our progressive values through our budget – where we ensure a robust safety net, universal health coverage, a strong education for all students. We try to build an economy that works for everyone by combining relentless economic and workforce development with efforts to level the playing field with a reasonable minimum wage, paid sick leave, hopefully one day paid family and parental leave. We do our part in the fight against discrimination and for equal rights.

But for me, the key to our community’s success is that we are welcoming and open. The message I want Montgomery County to send to the rest of the world is: Whoever you are, wherever you are from, whatever your economic status, if you are willing to work hard and be good to your neighbors, come to Montgomery County and share in the good life. You’ll have access to basic services, to training and education and jobs, your kids can go to a good school and play at great parks, and you will be safe. If you want to start a company you can find investors and a world class network of incubators, if you need employees we have the best educated workforce in the world.

I know that sounds grandiose, but at its core, the progressive values that drive the Democratic positions on economic issues, on social issues, are really about inclusion – about realizing a vision of shared prosperity – that’s it’s not enough for just the elite to prosper. And nothing is more fundamental to this vision than housing. Where you live determines the quality of your schools, what jobs you have access to, and so many other things. So I really believe that the community planning process we are engaged in today is really where the rubber meets the road for putting progressive values into action. That means providing income-restricted housing in every neighborhood to ensure that the very poorest and most vulnerable in our community have a place to live and aren’t clustered in high crime areas with little opportunity. We are breaking new ground by requiring at least 15% of new units to be affordable to low-income families. But it also means building enough housing to ensure that people of all income levels have a place here. If we don’t build enough housing to meet demand, prices rise and working class people are priced out.

And we have a moral imperative to plan this housing in an environmentally sustainable way. We know with scientific certainty what the combustion engine is doing to our planet. This means clustering new housing in existing communities rather than allowing green space to be developed and providing ways for people to get around on foot, by bike, and by public transit. While this plan is not on a metro station, and some of these new residents will certainly drive, the plan does make great strides in improving the walkability of the area and I am hopeful that expanded demand will allow us to improve bus service even further. But there can be no doubt that building townhouses on what is already a giant parking lot, just a mile from two metros, right across from the DC line, is far better for the environment than developing a farm or bulldozing a forest an hour north on 270.

Of course, our first principle must be do no harm. I don’t want to change any of the things that make Westbard wonderful. First, not a single existing home is being touched. We reduced the allowed development proposed by the Planning Board by half because we were convinced that it would have been too much, too fast for the roads, schools, and neighborhoods to handle. The plan before us today will only improve life for everyone in the Westbard sector. Traffic will be still be bad, but not noticeably worse. There will be new shopping and dining options and a great new park. The schools will still be great and Kenwood’s cherry blossoms will still bloom.

This also means making sure that the developers, who there is no doubt will make a profit from this project, pay their fair share to ensure there is adequate school and transportation capacity for all residents. This year we will be revising the Subdivision Staging Policy, which governs what developers must do and what they must pay to build in Montgomery County, and I know all my colleagues will be working to make sure that the rules line up with reality and we have the resources we need.

All in all, I truly believe this plan strikes the right balance between protecting and enhancing the things that make Westbard, and Montgomery County, such a wonderful place to live, while creating new opportunities for families from all socioeconomic backgrounds to enjoy our community’s marvelous resources.

By

Action In Montgomery for Senior Issues

On March 20th I attended the Action In Montgomery forum on seniors issues, featuring County Executive Leggett and Council President Berliner. This was without a doubt one of the most impressive community action events I have attended in Montgomery County. I knew I was in for something special when the organizer welcomed the crowd with a rousing speech about how “people working together can change the world.” I felt right at home. Then they put their values into action by bringing a representative from every faith group that was participating in the event to announce how many people they pledged to bring and how many they actually brought. Most of them exceeded their goal.

The purpose of the forum was to unveil the seniors agenda and have a public accountability session with the County Executive and Council President on the terms of the agenda. Here is the County Executive discussing the issues with them:

The AIM seniors agenda includes the following four points:

· Senior Housing: Require developers of housing projects built on county-owned land to set aside a portion of affordable and market rate units for 60+ residents. County also to leverage senior housing on private projects.

· Affordable Housing Money. Phase in full funding of the Housing Initiative Fund with general fund property tax dollars rather than bond funding beginning in FY 2014.

· Senior Housing Plan: Create a senior housing plan with AIM that includes yearly measurable goals.

· Transportation. Work on and fund creative senior transportation solutions that support Aging in Place.

These are all initiatives we can and must proceed with. For my own part, I am working with Council President Berliner on an initiative to promote mobility for seniors through transportation policy solutions. I have had some preliminary meetings with folks from the Commission on Aging and the plan is to have proposals this year that will address transportation issues.

On the question of housing, the perception out there is that when the county creates urban areas with condo and apartment buildings, we are just trying to lure young adults to the county. The reality, as anyone who knows the population of residents that currently lives on the 355, from Friendship Heights to Rockville, is that seniors are a huge market for this housing.

As the county’s population ages, boomers who are in single family houses today would transition to the condo/apartment lifestyle, opening up single family housing for millennials in search of a little more space for the family. Over lifespans, we need enough of each type of housing for everyone to trade places. Today, however, I do not believe the county has enough multi-family housing to make this possible.