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New protected bike lanes and dockless bike share come to Silver Spring

In a big win for the Silver Spring community, the County has unveiled new protected bike lanes on Spring St. and announced an agreement with MoBike to bring hundreds of dockless bike share bikes to the County. With your advocacy and the support of my Council Colleagues and the County Executive, Silver Spring is becoming one of the best and safest places in the region to jump on a bike.

Several years ago I asked the Planning Department to develop a low-stress bicycle network for Silver Spring and White Flint. At my request, the Council funded these infrastructure improvements in 2016. Last year we celebrated the second piece of the White Flint protected bike lane network, and work continues to complete the network there.

There is a lot to be happy about. Let’s make this a sign of what is to come for communities all across our great County. Biking should not just be for the brave, it needs to be an option for everyone, regardless of skill and comfort-level. More details and a video are below.


Leggett Celebrates New Protected Bike Lanes in Silver Spring; Announces Montgomery County Has Signed Agreement with Mobike to Add Dockless Bike Share in Silver Spring

October 3, 2017


ROCKVILLE, MD — Montgomery County Executive Ike Leggett today announced that the Montgomery County Department of Transportation (MCDOT) has completed construction of the first protected bike lane in downtown Silver Spring, a Bicycle and Pedestrian Priority Area. Leggett also announced that Montgomery County has signed an operating agreement with Mobike, making the County the first suburban jurisdiction in the U.S. to adopt this dockless bike share system. Mobike is the largest bike-sharing platform in the world. This month, these dockless bikes will be available in Silver Spring via a smartphone app.

“Today, we are celebrating two important developments in making bicycle travel in Montgomery County easier, safer and more accessible,” said Leggett. “We are adding a protected bike lane to our existing Silver Spring biking infrastructure and we are initiating a bike sharing agreement for a pilot project with Mobike to enable more people to travel by bicycle. This protected bike lane and enhanced access to shared bikes can help reduce traffic collisions, improve our traffic flow, and protect our environment.”

Silver Spring is an ideal location to expand biking options. The Montgomery County Department of Transportation built the protected bike lanes as part of a plan to create a network of low-stress biking infrastructure throughout the downtown area. The next step in building this network may include protected bike lanes on Wayne Avenue and Cameron Street. The network is intended to connect residents, workers and visitors to jobs, retail, recreation, entertainment and transit.

“We know that when we make biking safer by adding protected bike lanes, more people of all skill levels, young and old, will choose to bike,” said County Council Vice President Hans Riemer. “The Spring Street Protected Bike Lane will be a tremendous asset to the community, and it is just the beginning of a fully-separated bike lane network—known as the Silver Spring Circle—in downtown Silver Spring. I requested that Planning Staff design a Protected Bike Lane Network in Silver Spring and I’d like to commend the County Executive and his administration, and my Council colleagues, for making the Silver Spring Circle a reality.”

Montgomery County’s agreement with Mobike is a pilot project to test the concept of dockless bikes in Silver Spring. MCDOT is committed to working with businesses and residential communities to ensure a successful demonstration project.

To use Mobike, individuals will be able to download the Mobike app to register and locate a nearby bike, then unlock it by scanning the QR code. Once at their destination, the bicyclist can park the bike in an approved area and lock it, making it available for the next user. These bikes are powered by unique high-tech features including smart-lock technology, non-puncture airless tires, bike status sensors and built-in GPS locators.

“Montgomery County is the model for how we wish to work with communities across the U.S.,” said Jillian Irvin, head of U.S. government affairs for Mobike. “I want to thank Ike Leggett and everyone involved with the planning process for accepting us with open arms as we strive to make cycling the most convenient, affordable, and environmentally friendly transportation option for residents and tourists alike.”

The new Spring Street protected bike lanes are five to six feet wide and stretch eight-tenths of a mile along Spring and Cedar Streets, connecting the existing Cedar Street contraflow bike lane at Wayne Avenue to signed bike routes at Second Avenue, Fairview Road and Ellsworth Drive.

A striped buffer with flexposts separates the new bike lanes from motor vehicle traffic. The buffer varies in width from two feet to eight feet. Along most of the lane, on-street parking forms a barrier between the buffer and the travel lane. Pedestrian improvements include a shortened Spring Street crossing at Woodland Drive. The project includes bike boxes and two-stage queue boxes. These boxes allow bicyclists to make left turns at multi-lane intersections from the right-side separated bike lane.

The bike lane project includes the first floating bus stops in Montgomery County, designed to reduce conflicts between motor vehicles, bicycles and pedestrians. Four floating bus stops provide a bus boarding platform on the opposite side of the bike lane from the sidewalk. This allows bicyclists to travel safely in the protected lane without buses crossing over the bike lane or stopping in the bike lane to pick up or discharge passengers. Transit riders use a crosswalk to get across the bike lane. Floating bus stops have been constructed around the world and across North America.

Construction on the protected bike lanes began in May 2017. Work included a complete resurfacing of Spring Street and Cedar Street, with roadway foundation repair, as needed. The project budget was approximately $1.4 million.

The Mobike company officially launched its service in Shanghai in April 2016 and has since expanded its presence to 180 cities globally, including the District of Columbia. The company now operates more than seven million smart bikes and supports over 25 million rides every day. As of August 2017, Mobike users have collectively cycled over 5.6 billion kilometers, equivalent to reducing CO2 emissions by more than 1.26 million tons, or taking 350,000 cars off the road for a year.

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Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) and Express Bus Service on US 29

I support faster, more reliable transit service on US 29, because it will provide more and better transportation options to all residents and further the County’s environmental and smart growth goals. Under that framework, I joined my Council colleagues to support $7.5 million to study and design BRT service on US 29 and to support express, limited-stop RideOn service beginning in 2018 on US 29.

You can read details of the BRT plan here (pdf), but following are some key features of the proposal:

  • BRT service will begin in 2020
  • Buses will run on the shoulder in the northern section of the corridor (from Burtonsville to Industrial Parkway) and in mixed traffic south to Silver Spring
  • Buses will run every 7.5 minutes during rush hour and every 15 minutes outside of rush hour
  • The BRT system will have off-board fare collection, transit signal priority (TSP), specially branded vehicles, and elevated stations
  • Numerous pedestrian and bicycle improvements will be constructed simultaneously

While the overall plan is a meaningful step forward and achieves impressive travel time savings, the game changer for the corridor is securing dedicated lanes where congestion is the worst, south of Industrial Parkway. At that point, riding the bus becomes a much better service for those who do not have the opportunity to own a car as well as a real alternative for people who have a car. But if the bus is stuck in traffic, many people will prefer to just drive. This is why I advocated, successfully, for a study of an exciting and potentially effective concept for dedicated lanes in the median of US 29 south of Industrial Parkway. The key to this proposal, which was initiated by county residents and transit activists, particularly Sean Emerson and Sebastian Smoot, is shrinking the regular travel lanes from 12 to 10 feet. This makes enough room to add a dedicated lane for buses without taking a lane away from cars, a potential win-win situation. This summer County and State transportation officials will prepare cost estimates for this study, and the Council plans to introduce a special appropriation this fall to fund the effort.

In order to facilitate public discussion about this option, the Council required that the County Executive submit a subsequent appropriation request, subject to public hearing, to fund right-of-way acquisition and construction. This will give residents and the CACs plenty of opportunity review and comment on many salient features of system, such as station locations and the right-of-way requirements.

Finally, I have long argued that the County should be making incremental bus reforms now while we plan for high-quality BRT service in the future. To that end, the Council added money to the FY18 budget to begin express, limited-stop RideOn bus service on US 29 in early 2018. The new bus service will run from Burtonsville to Silver Spring during the morning and evening rush hours. The Council also approved $1 million to begin express, limited-stop RideOn bus service on MD 355, from Lakeforest Mall to Medical Center Metro Station. I believe these efforts will provide much needed service quickly while we continue planning and designing a high quality BRT system.

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Funding a study for dedicated lanes on US 29 BRT

If a bus could move past traffic, wouldn’t you be more likely to ride it? That is the premise behind the need for “dedicated lanes” for buses. When a bus has a dedicated lane, it can move past traffic jams. At that point, riding the bus becomes a much better service for those who do not have the opportunity to own a car as well as a real alternative for people who have a car. But if the bus is stuck in traffic, many people will prefer to just drive.

Today, the Council’s Transportation Committee supported my request for further study of an exciting and potentially effective proposal to create dedicated lanes for buses south of Industrial Parkway as part of a US 29 BRT plan. The key to this proposal, which was initiated by county residents and transit activists, particularly Sean Emerson and Sebastian Smoot, is shrinking the regular travel lanes from 12 to 10 feet. This makes enough room to add a dedicated lane for buses without taking a lane away from cars, a potential win-win situation.

The County Department of Transportation agreed to prepare a supplemental appropriation to fund the study for the Council’s review at a later date. My MEMO is below.

MEMORANDUM

To: Transportation, Infrastructure, Energy & Environment Committee
From: Council Vice President Hans Riemer
Date: May 2, 2017
Re: US 29 BRT Dedicated Lane Proposal


I am writing to urge your support to further develop a potentially effective concept for a dedicated bus rapid transit lane south of Industrial Parkway for the US 29 BRT.

Like many of you, I recently met with Sean Emerson and Sebastian Smoot to discuss their proposal to improve BRT on US 29. As you know, the current proposal before the County Council calls for BRT vehicles to ride in the shoulder on the northern section of corridor, providing a dedicated lane. South of Industrial Parkway, to the Silver Spring Transit Center, the vehicles would travel in mixed traffic.

While the overall plan is a meaningful step forward for bus service, the game changer for the corridor is securing dedicated lanes where congestion is the worst, south of Industrial Parkway. Mr. Emerson’s proposal envisions a dedicated lane and platforms in the median of US 29 south of Industrial Parkway. Mr. Emerson’s proposed dedicated lane can largely be accommodated within the existing curbs and without removing travel lanes, which reduces additional impacts. In fact, it seems possible that most or all of the elements of the Executive’s proposal would nest readily into Mr. Emerson’s more comprehensive plan.

My understanding is that MCDOT and SHA have expressed interest in the proposal. I believe the next step after approving the Executive’s proposed project is to identify the funding to flesh out the design of Mr. Emerson’s proposal, as well as engaging the US 29 Citizens Advisory Committees.

Therefore, I respectfully request your support for the further study of a dedicated BRT lane between Industrial Parkway and Downtown Silver Spring.

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Update on the Nighttime Economy Task Force

To be competitive for creative-class workers as well as empty-nesters, Montgomery County must be able to offer the new urban quality of life that those residents are seeking. To advance this issue, I requested the County Executive to establish the Nighttime Economy Task Force, which examined policies, resources and amenities that impact Montgomery County’s nightlife offerings. The task force led to the passage of numerous pieces of legislation in the Maryland state legislature as well as the County Council, all of which make it easier for restaurant and entertainment-oriented businesses to thrive in Montgomery County. I think it has been a success.

Please see the most recent implementation report below (PDF), as prepared by the County Executive’s team.

Nighttime Economy Task Force Implementation Summary May, 2015

Task Force Recommendations

County Executive Ike Leggett appointed the Montgomery County Nighttime Economy Task Force in May 2013 to explore ways of improving nightlife offerings at Montgomery County’s urban centers to meet the changing needs of our community.

After five months of intense work, the Nighttime Economy Task Force delivered the report, “Destination Montgomery,” to the County Executive with 32 recommendations for improving options and quality nightlife in Montgomery County. These recommendations covered the following six areas:

  1. Arts and Entertainment,
  2. Business Engagement,
  3. Public Space and Amenities,
  4. Quality of Life,
  5. Transportation, and
  6. Venue Operations and Public Safety.

Implementation Overview

A year and half after the report’s official release, the recommendations are at varying stages of implementation. A few have been implemented, some are actively being implemented, others are being further evaluated, and a few are no longer applicable or supported by the County government.

Recommendations successfully implemented

  1. Recommendation: Extend the hours of operation for venues with beer/wine/liquor licenses to 2 am on Sundays through Thursdays, and to 3 am on Fridays, Saturdays, and the Sundays before Monday federal holidays.
    Status: HB-463 and SB-657 were passed were passed in support of the recommendation.
  2. Recommendation: Expedite the creation of a social venue license, and modify the current alcohol to food ratio under the Class B beer/wine/liquor license from 50/50 to 60/40, to reflect the change in increased demand for higher quality, higher priced alcoholic beverages and to encourage establishment and operation of venues that host live music and other events.
    Status: HB-142 and SB-300 were passed in support of the recommendation.
  3. Recommendation: Develop an educational Patron Responsibility Program.
    Status: Montgomery County Department of Liquor Control (DLC) has partnered with Brown-Forman and a designated driver program called “Be My Designated Driver” (BeMyDD), to encourage people to plan their night out and ensure a safe ride home. These programs are being promoted by alcohol serving venues with a planned community education program with private sponsorship.
  4. Recommendations: Planning or Zoning Changes:
    1. Amend zoning standards to provide flexibility in meeting public use space and open space requirements.
    2. Support additional density in the County’s urban areas to foster a vibrant
      nighttime economy.
    3. Explore alternative, more attractive incentives for developers to include suitable, affordable performance spaces for small and emerging arts groups.

    Status: The Montgomery County National Park and Planning Commission finalized in 2014 the Zoning Rewrite for the county which ultimately, updated zoning codes and the zoning map that helped address the recommendations listed above. One remaining opportunity revolves around understanding the opportunities available under the Arts & Entertainment Districts. The Department of Economic Development is helping draft information both for the Planning Department and other entities on the Arts & Entertainment Districts but also other related tax incentives that exist for developers including Enterprise Zones, Façade Improvements, Green Building Codes, the Public Art amenity, just to name a few.

Recommendations being Implemented (in progress)

  1. Recommendation: Improve awareness of parking options.
    Status: All three urban districts are in agreement in utilizing and promoting the ParkMe application (www.parkme.com) for visitors and consumers, which is the preferred application by the Montgomery County Parking Lot District.
  2. Recommendation: Marketing County business resources and assets.
    1. Market A&E districts and county business resources to property owners.
    2. Create, develop, and implement a marketing program for the County.

    Status: These above recommendations are being advanced by multiple partners. The three A&E districts are exploring Placemaking options to enhance urban vitality and an inviting atmosphere that include both daytime and nighttime hours. The Office of the County Executive is taking a lead on developing a comprehensive economic strategy that will include better alignment of place-based economic development and program- based economic development. It is also in the middle of a multi-year marketing and branding project with several short-term projects to be delivered in spring 2015.

  3. Recommendation: Develop and implement a busker program to provide entertainment in urban areas.
    Status: The Silver Spring Regional Center and the Montgomery County Innovation Program has been developing the idea of a busker program to be piloted with the Silver Spring Arts & Entertainment Advisory Committee, the Silver Spring Citizens Advisory Board and Silver Spring Urban District Advisory Committee. This group has been working on several areas including Identifying Potential Busking Areas, Developing the Specific Parameters for Busking, Enforcement, and Promotions and Marketing.
  4. Recommendation: Enhance pedestrian and bicycle access.
    Status: Bethesda, Silver Spring, and Wheaton are all moving forward to achieve this goal based on their unique needs. Bethesda has made a top priority improving lighting. Silver Spring and Wheaton have made has made pedestrian walkability a top priority through lighting, walking and biking accessibility.
  5. Recommendation: Create Urban Parks Guidelines to activate public space through design elements, enhance the greater community, and foster multiple uses to appeal to a range of demographics at different times.
    Status: The Department of Parks is working with Planning on efforts to activate spaces such as in Silver Spring, especially in areas that are not public parks but are public properties or quasi-public such as WMATA, while developing guidelines for new development particularly within urban areas to help define and develop spaces that can foster activity both during the day and evening.

Recommendations being further evaluated

  1. Recommendations: Developing transportation options.
    1. Expand the “Safe Ride” program to all weekends (Friday evening through early
      Sunday morning).
    2. Increase the number of taxi stands.

    Status: Due to the changing market and new players like Uber that are challenging existing regulations and established players like taxis, the Council is working on addressing taxi regulations that will help address the recommendations moving forward.

  2. Recommendations: Business Services Tailored to the Small Business Community.
    1. Create a concierge service that promotes positive customer service, assists with streamlining the planning and permitting process, and facilitates working relationships with multiple departments for the business consumer.
      Status: Several departments provide concierge service to small businesses including the Department of Economic Development, the Department of Liquor Control, and the Department of Permitting Services.
    2. Recommendation: Simplify and streamline the process businesses must go through in order to open an arts and entertainment venue or hold an arts and entertainment event.
      Status: The County Council has just approved a new Ombudsman in the Office of the County Executive for commercial and residential development projects who will report directly to the Chief Administrative Officer. DPS has consolidated the permitting process to support new and existing restaurants through its “Recipes for Success Packet” to explain the process of opening a restaurant in Montgomery County.
  3. Recommendation: Develop a targeted strategic plan for attracting new companies to the County, fostering entrepreneurship, and growing our existing businesses based upon the target markets.
    Status: The Comprehensive Economic Strategy underway will address the above issues and serve as a comprehensive blueprint for Montgomery County’s future economic success, including how retail and placemaking can support an overall economic vision and vitality. Achieving this recommendation would require further research into the retail inventory in the county’s urban centers ultimately leading to the creation of a retail plan for the county. This would help show gaps in retail, especially with those that are and/or can become retail destinations. That information would then lead to the strategic and targeted company attraction referenced by the task force.
  4. Planning and Development
    1. Recommendation: Reduce opportunity for crime in urban areas by incorporating Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) techniques.
      Status: This is a shared responsibility between a cluster of departments including Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission, General Services and the urban districts in creative placemaking to eliminate dead spots and create an inviting atmosphere at the urban centers.
    2. Recommendation: Encourage more housing options.
      Status: Two issues related to housing options need to be addressed–the size of dwelling units and the parking standards for these developments that need to be further explored.
  5. Transportation Options at Night
    Recommendations:

    1. Improve/expand the circulator service in focus areas.
    2. Expand the frequency and reach of late-night transit service.

    Status: All three urban districts would encourage WMATA to extend hours on weekends to 3am, especially with the extension of hours to 3am in FY15. Additional bus service should be considered if demand increases over time.

  6. Urban Districts Support and Development
    Recommendations:

    1. Support dedicated public safety resources for the nighttime economy in high density
      urban centers.
    2. Increase funding for Business Improvement Districts and Urban Districts.
    3. Professionally manage and maintain public spaces through the private sector or
      through public-private partnerships (similar to the Bethesda Urban Partnership). Urban District would like to increase coordination with MNCPPC as Optional Method Developments (OMDs) come on board within the districts to activate public and private spaces.

    Status: These are long-term, broad-based recommendations, most of which will be supported as demand for services increases over time, especially for police and the urban districts services in each area. To sustain this enforcement would certainly require identifying the related departments and future funding sources, especially as it pertains to the urban districts. How this is achieved depends heavily on the types of services to be delivered in each urban district or new ones identified over time.

  7. Urban Noise Areas
    Recommendation: Amend the County’s noise ordinance to allow for the establishment of Urban Noise Areas around appropriate locations (e.g., Rockville’s Town Square, Silver Spring’s Veteran’s Plaza and downtown); increase the allowable noise levels for qualifying arts and entertainment activities in these areas to 85 dBA (measured at 100 feet from stage, PA, or other center of the performance); increase the time allowed for these levels to midnight; and ensure that nearby residents are informed prior to moving in of the possibility of event-related noise.
    Status: There are some policy considerations about the recommendation of the NETF, which is a “one-size fits all” approach that proposes a noise standard that could allow much higher noise at receiving properties than currently permitted under Chapter 31B. The recommendation also proposes a different approach to regulating noise than the current noise law by regulating the level of noise a source is permitted to produce rather than the level of noise heard by a receptor. This ignores the reality that different locations have different characteristics, and that what is reasonable at one location may be unreasonable at another. For these reasons, DEP believes it would be prudent to establish specific parameters for each UNA depending on the characteristics of the site. Some policy guidance would have to be provided regarding the balance between those entities creating the noise and those affected by it.

Recommendations no longer applicable or supported
The below recommendations are not being actively supported by the County government at this point for various reasons.

  1. Recommendation: Allow food trucks to operate after 10pm.
    Status: Montgomery County government is exploring options for mobile vending for all hours, not limited to nighttime hours.
  2. Recommendation: Artist tax that would incentivize venues that pay musicians to performance.
    Status: This recommendation is deemed a low-impact measure and thus not supported at this time.
  3. Recommendation: Development of Large-Scale Nighttime Events.
    Status: All three urban areas are concerned about large scale events that may compete with surrounding businesses.